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Iroquois lacrosse team stuck in NY ahead of Game 2

 Ansley Jemison, general managager of the Iroquois Nationals lacrosse team responds to questions during a news interview in Battery Park Thursday, Jul...
 Ron Cogan, left, and Marty Ward, second from left, join other members of the Iroquois Nationals lacrosse team gather in Battery Park Thursday, July 1...
 Members of the Iroquois Nationals lacrosse team pose for photographs in Battery Park Thursday, July 15, 2010 in New York. The American Indian lacross...
 Ron Cogan, center, and Isaiah Kicknosway, left, join other members of the Iroquois Nationals lacrosse team at Battery Park Thursday, July 15, 2010 in...

Lacrosse Iroquois Passports

Ansley Jemison, general managager of the Iroquois Nationals lacrosse team responds to questions during a news interview in Battery Park Thursday, Jul...

Lacrosse Iroquois Passports

Ron Cogan, left, and Marty Ward, second from left, join other members of the Iroquois Nationals lacrosse team gather in Battery Park Thursday, July 1...

Lacrosse Iroquois Passports

Members of the Iroquois Nationals lacrosse team pose for photographs in Battery Park Thursday, July 15, 2010 in New York. The American Indian lacross...

Lacrosse Iroquois Passports

Ron Cogan, center, and Isaiah Kicknosway, left, join other members of the Iroquois Nationals lacrosse team at Battery Park Thursday, July 15, 2010 in...

An Iroquois lacrosse team that has been blocked from traveling to a tournament in England because they refuse to use U.S. or Canadian passports was spending another day in limbo Friday while hoping for a diplomatic breakthrough.
The 23 members of the Iroquois Nationals team have already missed their first scheduled game of the World Lacrosse Championships. The United Kingdom has refused to recognize passports issued by the Iroquois confederacy.
Team manager Ansley Jemison said Friday morning that negotiations were continuing with British authorities and the squad still hoped to be able to leave on a flight early Friday evening.
Their next game is scheduled for Saturday. The team had to forfeit its first game, scheduled for Thursday against England, when it didn't arrive.
Members of the team say they will only use passports issued by the confederacy, a centuries old league of semiautonomous Indian nations whose residents mostly live now in New York, Ontario and Quebec, because they do not consider themselves citizens of the U.S. or Canada.
Some countries had accepted the Iroquois, or Haudenosaunee, passports in the past, but many have tightened travel rules in recent years and months to crack down on document fraud and illegal immigration.
About a half dozen players, some carrying lacrosse sticks, milled about in the small lobby of a hotel in in the New York City borough of Queens on Friday morning where the team has been staying during the dispute. None wanted to talk about what's gone on.
On Thursday, the team's chairman, Oren Lyons, sounded hopeful a solution was in the works, saying there had been "movement" in discussions with the U.K.
But a spokesman for Britain's Home Office who spoke on condition of anonymity in keeping with ministry rules said there had been no change in the country's position.
The team had initially been barred from traveling by the U.S., which said the Iroquois passports lacked the necessary security features for border crossings.
After Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton intervened, the team got a one-time waiver, but the British government has so far refused to budge.
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Associated Press writer Sylvia Hui in London contributed to this report.


Updated : 2021-03-04 12:08 GMT+08:00