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U.S. security strategy to lay out President Obama's doctrine

U.S. security strategy to lay out President Obama's doctrine

President Barack Obama's administration unveiled a new security strategy yesterday that places the focus on homegrown extremists and steps back from the Bush era's "war on terror" terminology.
The administration is also likely to stress that U.S. military superiority must be matched by muscular diplomacy and all the tools of statecraft, from development aid to intelligence gathering.
The new document will be released with the United States still with a huge foreign military commitment, in Iraq and Afghanistan, facing new terror threats and with the world destabilized by the worst economic meltdown since the 1930s.
It will be closely read for signs Obama has adjusted his policy of offering dialogue to U.S. foes like Iran and North Korea, which has yet to bear fruit, and will come against a backdrop of his bedrock nuclear non-proliferation effort.
Secretary of State Hillary Clinton will Thursday make a major speech at the Brookings Institution, laying out diplomatic and military aspects of the strategy and national security advisor James Jones was due to weigh in later.
For the first time, the government strategy document, which lays down a doctrine for national security policy, and can impact defense spending, is likely to focus attention on the threat posed by homegrown, radical extremists.
Following a spate of attacks or near misses - at Fort Hood military base last year and in Times Square, New York, this month - the administration appears to have reframed the matrix of threats to U.S. national security.
"We've seen an increasing number of individuals here in the United States become captivated by extremist activities or causes," said John Brennan, deputy national security advisor for counter-terrorism and homeland security."The president's national security strategy explicitly recognizes the threat to the United States posed by individuals radicalized here at home," Brennan said Wednesday at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.


Updated : 2021-01-19 02:24 GMT+08:00