Alexa
  • Directory of Taiwan

China Times: Learn from Korean pop idols' global ambition

China Times: Learn from Korean pop idols' global ambition

Five female lawmakers performed the super popular Korean pop song "Nobody" at a Lunar New Year gathering at the Legislative Yuan last week. Their imitation of the singing and dancing of the South Korean pop group Wonder Girls might not have been as vibrant and charming, but the performance brought joy and festivity to the often rowdy legislature.
"Nobody" is a Wonder Girls song released as a digital single in September 2008. The song became popular in South Korea within hours, emerging as a top search term and ranking No. 1 on digital music sites in that country.
Over the past year, "Nobody" along with another Korean pop song "Sorry, Sorry" have transcended national borders and language barriers to become household lyrics embraced by people of various different nationalities and generations in many Asian countries.
The two songs share several common features -- their melodies are beautiful and the dances accompanying them are wonderful and sexy.
They epitomize the Korean entertainment industry's ambitious business strategy -- South Korean entertainers want to conquer the world market.
Some popular Korean actors and actresses have already inspired a craze in Asia for studying the Korean language through their performances in popular TV soap operas.
Now, a new generation of Korean pop singers are taking aim at the global music scene. Their handlers have set their sights on the world market as evidenced in the selection of pop group members and the composition of their songs.
The music style is "Western" and the lyrics are in English. If you close your eyes when listening to their signing, you might not be able to discern that the signers are Koreans.
On the other hand, they attach great importance to catering to the tastes of the Chinese-speaking population. All young Korean pop group members are required to study Chinese. They can communicate with Chinese fans in Mandarin and some of them can sing Mandarin pop songs and even plan to release Chinese albums.
Pop culture tends to carry strong features of "Glocalization" -- a blend of globalization and localization -- that requires globalized thinking coupled with localized action.
The South Korean entertainment industry's ambitious strategy to tap into the vast Chinese-language music market is worthy of attention. Just like their success in the consumer electronics market, Korean pop music idols have also reaped the rewards of their "glocalization" efforts. (Feb. 28, 2010) (By Sofia Wu)




Updated : 2021-07-26 13:15 GMT+08:00