Alexa

Talk of the Day -- News digest of local media -- Beef aftershock

Talk of the Day -- News digest of local media -- Beef aftershock

United States trade authorities threatened to ask the World Trade Organization (WTO) to arbitrate the dispute over its beef exports after Taiwan broke its promise to fully reopen Taiwan's market to U.S. beef and beef products.
At the same time, however, the U.S. de facto ambassador to Taiwan, Raymond F. Burghardt, guaranteed President Ma Ying-jeou during Ma's stopover in San Francisco on Jan. 25 that bilateral relations between the two countries are "in good shape." The following are excerpts from local media coverage of the issue: China Times: Taiwan's trade negotiators have been worried since the legislature revised laws to ban the import of U.S. ground beef and offals that Washington would take retaliatory action.
Nevertheless, it is not just an economic and trade issue. Taking political factors into account, the United States should have to face reality.
If Taiwan-U.S. ties turn sour, U.S. national interests will face even more uncertain factors. Taiwanese officials have believed that as Taiwan and China move toward an economic cooperation framework agreement, the U.S. government will be cautious in retaliating over the beef issue.
The U.S. government could harm not just Taiwan-U.S. relations but also its prestige and national interests if it takes a disproportionate measure of revenge.
United Daily News: United States Deputy Trade Representative Demetrios Marantis demanded that Taiwan carry out the Taiwan-U.S beef protocol, spelling out that Washington feels "extremely disappointed" with the amendment passed by Taiwan's Legislative Yuan that partially bans imports of U.S. beef products.
Marantis said the beef dispute has affected the reliability of Taiwan as a trade partner to the United States, but he added that the door remains open for talks to settle the dispute.
Liberty Times: Asked whether or not Washington will take retaliatory action against Taiwan, Deputy Trade Representative Demetrios Marantis confirmed that the U.S. government is considering all possible options, including filing a complaint at the WTO.
Amid high unemployment and a sluggish recovery facing the Barack Obama government, the U.S. Trade Representative's Office has aggressively tried to open the Asian market for U.S. beef. The obstacle against U.S. beef exports to Taiwan has obviously disrupted the office's overall initiative.
United Evening News: Though President Ma Ying-jeou spoke with U.S congressmen on the beef issue during his stopover in San Francisco, the U.S. deputy trade representative still expressed disappointment and said the government was considering filing a complaint with the WTO.
Ruling Kuomintang Legislator Lin Yi-shih said Taiwan needs to make more of an effort to communicate with the U.S. government, while opposition Democratic Progressive Party Legislator Tsai Huang-liang, said Ma had not actually gained the U.S.' understanding and compromise.
Tsai argued that if the U.S. files a complaint with the WTO, it will constitute interference in Taiwan's domestic affairs and anger Taiwan's people, because it was a legislative resolution that banned U.S. ground beef and offals from entering Taiwan.
(By Elizabeth Hsu)




Updated : 2021-04-17 04:19 GMT+08:00