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What were they thinking? Let's review

What were they thinking? Let's review

Every decade has its mistakes, of course, but one nice thing about the past 10 years' foibles, foul-ups and flubs is that so often they came with neat monikers, almost like keepsakes: "Wardrobe malfunction." "If I did it." "Balloon boy."
Here's a review of four what-were-they-thinking moments.
1. Aerial ambitiousness also gave us the balloon boy. When a homemade foil-covered balloon supposedly slipped its tether with a 6-year-old inside, we all held our breath _ except some heavy-breathing cable anchors. The balloon finally landed _ empty _ and the kid was found safe at home, hiding, his father said. But why? "You had said that we did this for a show," the tyke told Dad, a would-be reality TV star, live on CNN. Whoops. Hoax charges followed.
2. Publishing mistake of the decade, coming in 2006: "If I Did It," former football star O.J. Simpson's book about how the murders of which he was acquitted might have been carried out. Amid furious protest, the project was aborted, the book was ordered "pulped," and the publisher acknowledged its "ill-considered project." And that wasn't the biggest faux pas of the decade for OJ. No. 1 was going to that Nevada hotel with weapon-toting friends to "reclaim" his sports memorabilia. "It was," said the sentencing judge, "much more than stupidity."
3. "So, we were watching the boob tube Sunday..." So began an editorial in the Lebanon (Pennsylvania) Daily News, commenting on the 2004 Super Bowl halftime show during which singer Justin Timberlake tore away part of Janet Jackson's costume, momentarily exposing her breast in what was later called a "wardrobe malfunction." Knowing the offense given to millions of live viewers (plus those offended again and again as they cued up the YouTube rerun), Federal Communications Commission smut-busters imposed a fine _ but that, too, turned out to be a mistake. Arbitrary and capricious, a federal appeals court ruled.
4. Finally, it must be acknowledged there were a few mistakes in the entertainment world _ and we're not just talking about auditions for the hit the TV show "American Idol." No, at least those didn't cost $100 million, the amount investors plowed into the 2002 movie "The Adventures of Pluto Nash." Basically, nobody showed up at the box office. Well, not quite nobody. "I know two or three people that liked this movie," said the star, Eddie Murphy. Who knew there'd be no audience for a comedy about a nightclub arson on the moon?


Updated : 2021-10-22 04:19 GMT+08:00