Alexa
  • Directory of Taiwan

Talk of the Day -- News digest of local news media -- Unification

Talk of the Day -- News digest of local news media -- Unification

After the Wall Street Journal Asia misquoted President Ma Ying-jeou on his vision of the future development of relations with China, the Presidential Office responded quickly, highlighting how contentious talk of cross-strait unification is.
The newspaper quoted Ma as saying: "Whether there will be reunification as expected by the mainland side depends very much on what is going to unfold in the next decade, " but the Presidential Office produced a recording showing that Ma actually said "decades." Opposition groups took the opportunity to again stress that Taiwan's future should be decided by its people in a national referendum, not by any single party or individual.
The following is a digest of some local media reports on the latest developments related to the sensitive unification issue: United Daily News: President Ma Ying-jeou reaffirmed Tuesday that he will not negotiate unification with China during his term in office and that his cross-strait policy is no independence, no unification and no use of force while maintaining the status quo.
In a private meeting with professor Winston L. Y. Yang from Seton Hall University of the United States, Ma also clearly said that "there is little support in Taiwan for unification with China." (Dec.
16, 2009) Liberty Times: The ruling Kuomintang suffered a setback in recent local elections and a recent opinion poll suggests it has to do with the Ma administration's China-oriented political and economic policies.
A poll released by CommonWeath Magazine Tuesday showed that 61 percent of the people worried that Taiwan's economy is too dependent on China.
The survey also found that 62 percent of respondents identified themselves as Taiwanese, 22 percent as both Taiwanese and Chinese, and only eight percent as Chinese. Among those in the 18-29 age bracket, 75 percent said they are Taiwanese. (Dec. 16, 2009) China Times: Opposition Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) Chairwoman Tsai Ing-wen said in Tokyo Tuesday that the party will insist that Taiwan's people decide their future.
Speaking at the Foreign Correspondents' Club of Japan in Tokyo, Tsai also said that the party will safeguard the democratic system in Taiwan to let Taiwan's people choose and decide their own future.
(Dec. 16, 2009) (By Lilian Wu)