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Ma pushes for adoption of global covenants into domestic law

Ma pushes for adoption of global covenants into domestic law

Taipei, Dec. 11 (CNA) President Ma Ying-jeou said Friday that Taiwan will continue to adopt international covenants as domestic law to demonstrate its willingness to meet its responsibilities as a member of the global village.
Ma said Taiwan will keep "internalizing" international covenants -- formal international treaties that Taiwan cannot sign or was forced out of because it is not a United Nations member -- to facilitate its integration into the international community.
The president hailed the adoption of two U. N. covenants -- the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights -- into domestic law, as bringing Taiwan's human rights protection on a par with international norms.
The two convenants took effect in Taiwan Thursday.
Addressing a round-table with a group of representatives from the local legal and judiciary sector, Ma said the Ministry of Justice will review relevant laws and statutes of the country and come up with amendment suggestions in two years if it finds certain articles run against the spirit of those two U.N. human rights covenants.
"It will be a giant legal engineering feat in the history of the Republic of China," the president said.
From Thursday on, any individual in the Republic of China can cite these two laws on human rights protection, which is an important step for Taiwan, Ma said.
The Legislative Yuan passed a bill in March this year to make these two treaties domestic law.
Taiwan was one of the original signatories to the two treaties in 1967 when the Republic of China was still a U.N. member. It did not incorporate the treaties into local law before losing its U.N. seat in 1971.
Meanwhile, Ma told the panelists that from Jan. 1, 2010, computer monitors will be installed and used at prosecutors' questioning sessions so that the suspects can watch the recording of his or her interrogation as it happens.
"This will contribute to reducing controversies afterward and better protecting the suspects' human rights," he said.
He added that the practice of illegal wiretapping or telephone monitoring that has been long condemned by society will disappear.
In related news, representatives of disadvantaged people and legal and judiciary groups met with President Ma Friday to lodge appeals and propose suggestions on judicial reforms.
The representatives, headed by Taiwan Law Society Chairman Wellington Koo, suggested that a judicial reform committee be established under the Presidential Office, with half of the committee's members coming from the private sector to serve as supervisors.
They also suggested that President Ma give judicial reform as high a priority as a government campaign against corruption and make a progress report to the public once every three months, according to Koo.
"The president said he will see to it that the Judicial Yuan and the Ministry of Justice come up with concrete plans on the reform program in one month," Koo noted.
(By Garfie Lee, Ann Chi-shen and Deborah Kuo)




Updated : 2021-10-19 03:51 GMT+08:00