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Mexican bishops calls for end to drug violence

 Mexican Cardinal Norberto Rivera gestures during Mass at the metropolitan cathedral in Mexico City, Sunday, Nov. 8, 2009. Roman Catholic clergy, incr...
 Police officers stand in front of a hotel that was attack  in Tijuana, northern Mexico, late Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2009. No injures were report after uni...

Mexico Drug War Church

Mexican Cardinal Norberto Rivera gestures during Mass at the metropolitan cathedral in Mexico City, Sunday, Nov. 8, 2009. Roman Catholic clergy, incr...

Mexico Drug War

Police officers stand in front of a hotel that was attack in Tijuana, northern Mexico, late Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2009. No injures were report after uni...

Mexico's Roman Catholic bishops said Thursday that government officials must do a better job stamping out corruption to stop drug violence, and the clergy also has a role to play.
A Mexican Council of Bishops statement read to reporters stopped short of making specific recommendations but condemned anyone who sells, transports or uses drugs. It described trafficking as a dirty business that seduces people by promising well-being, while bringing only violence and death.
"Enough already! Stop harming yourselves and stop causing so much damage and pain to our young people, our families and our homeland," said Monsignor Miguel Angel Alba, bishop of La Paz, reading from the statement.
The council had planned to issue a report containing its recommendations Thursday, but Alba said members were still debating after three days and now hope to release it by the new year. Bishops say it will include concrete steps the church can take.
"We are not far from the people. We are part of the community. ... We hear the voice of the people directly, and we directly see their wounds," Alba said.
Violence has claimed nearly 14,000 lives since President Felipe Calderon launched a crackdown on drug gangs after taking office in December 2006.
Mexico trails only Colombia as the most dangerous for priests in Latin America, with two out of every 10 priests here facing serious risks, according to an August study by the council.
In drafting a strategy for confronting drug violence, the bishops sought advice from Colombian and Italian priests who have faced similar threats from organized crime.


Updated : 2021-06-17 17:00 GMT+08:00