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Favre doesn't think he'll be nervous at Green Bay

Favre doesn't think he'll be nervous at Green Bay

Before Brett Favre's first preseason game with the Minnesota Vikings, involving a mere six snaps, he was nervous and nauseous.
Just before the Vikings played his former Green Bay Packers that August day at home, Favre muttered to himself, "Man, I'm losing it."
So how anxious must he be THIS week? It's the highly hyped return match in Green Bay at Lambeau Field, where betrayed fans will be waiting with what could be a cold welcome and the Packers are eagerly preparing to avenge their recent defeat.
"I don't think it'll be as bad," Favre said, "but I don't know that."
The NFL's all-time leading passer is making his first visit to the site where he played 16 exceptional seasons, helped revive the Packers, and led them to two Super Bowls, winning one.
Just don't expect Favre to reveal a mental or emotional breakdown in anticipation of Sunday's main event.
"I think that's probably more intriguing to everyone else," Favre said.
He expects a mixture of cheers and boos, but insisted "there's no sentiments" about the upcoming trip. On Wednesday, he wasn't keen to reminisce.
Favre is more concerned about the NFC North division race between the leading Vikings and the chasing Packers. After appearing stiff and tired during his news conference, Favre loosened up and joked about checking fan mail from Green Bay for "something ticking" or "white powder." He revealed that only two of his family members are going to the game, denying that a bunch of hotel rooms for his relatives had already been booked this summer.
"I'm way too cheap for that," Favre said.
Vikings coach Brad Childress didn't plan any special talks with his quarterback.
"He's a 40-year-old man, as you know," Childress said.
Teammate Ryan Longwell, who left the Packers to join the Vikings in 2006, talked to Favre several times this summer as he mulled coming to Minnesota. By far, their longest conversation was about this particular game.
"I think it'll be different for him, but I think he'll know how to handle it," Longwell said.
After Favre's first retirement in 2008, he tried to force his way back with the Packers, who ultimately decided he wouldn't fit there anymore. Favre acknowledged on Wednesday "it's probably best that things worked out the way they did."
After playing for the New York Jets last season, retiring again then reconsidering again to sign with the Vikings, Favre is in prime form for a talented, well-rounded team with serious Super Bowl aspirations.
That's what burns Packers fans the most.
"I think our fans here in Green Bay are first class, and I think they'll do what they feel is appropriate," Packers coach Mike McCarthy said, when asked what kind of reception he thinks Favre will get.
Favre has maintained a defiant stance when asked about his deteriorating legacy in Green Bay. He repeatedly said his success there should speak for itself, and described a stream of supportive letters he's received from Packers supporters since he left.
"If you're a true fan, you're a true fan," he said, adding: "The people that have jumped ship or whatever completely, what can I do? ... There was always Brett Favre haters out there, and that will never change."


Updated : 2020-12-02 16:06 GMT+08:00