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Online game aims to raise appreciation for beauty of Chinese language

Online game aims to raise appreciation for beauty of Chinese language

Taipei, Oct. 15 (CNA) An online game developed by Taiwan's top research institute Academia Sinica was unveiled Thursday to allow players to learn more about Chinese characters and appreciate the beauty of the Chinese language.
The game, dubbed Chinese Scrabble and crafted by researchers from the Institute of Linguistics and the Institute of History and Philology at Academia Sinica, allows players to tell, via a thinning method, how a Chinese character is made up with radicals.
The game is the latest result of a collaboration between the two institutes since 2002 to carry out a language archive project, which has now entered its second phase.
The game was only one small part of a digital archives exhibition titled "Language in Space and Time, " that was opened at Academia Sinica, located in Taipei City's northeastern suburb on Nankang.
The exhibition features five themes, including digitalized archives of oral languages used by Taiwanese indigenous people and their ancestors, all of whom belong to the Austronesian language family.
Also on display are digital reproductions and grammatical annotations of words carved on excavated oracle bones, bronzes, and bamboo, or imprinted on silk documents. The displays also include other ancient Chinese texts passed down through the millennia.
The digitized recordings and transcriptions of the Taiwan Min and Hakka dialects, and an archive of the sounds of modern Chinese are also on display.
Addressing the opening of the exhibition, Sun Tien-hsin, director of the Institute of History and Philology, said: "In the past, linguistic records could only be preserved in written form on shells and bones, bronze, bamboo, stone, paper, silk, and so on, whereas nowadays we can not only use digitization methods to reproduce such records and annotate them, but we can also make use of multimedia to record and further analyze the oral language." At the exhibition, visitors can also choose to make their own electronic New Year's greeting cards using oracle bones or bronze inscription characters.
(By Deborah Kuo)




Updated : 2021-10-23 12:29 GMT+08:00