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Taiwan editorial abstracts

Taiwan editorial abstracts

Taipei, Aug. 26 (CNA) The following is a brief roundup of selected local newspaper editorials Wednesday: APPLE DAILY:: New flu crisis The medical sector has estimated that swine flu infections could peak between November and next January, and that 30 percent of Taiwan's population, or 7 million people, could be infected.
The figure is terrible. After the opening of schools in September, the cross infection is expected to be serious.
The Ma administration should learn something from its bungled response to Typhoon Morakot, which triggered the worst flooding and mudslides in Taiwan in half a century.
An erratic command mechanism has been one cause of expanded disasters. If the Ma administration can make prior preparations and efficiently deal with the possible outbreak, it can save some of the face it lost in its incompetent handling of the rescue and relief mission during the typhoon.
CHINA TIMES: Disaster prevention the military's 'core mission' The military's bungled response to the serious flooding triggered by Typhoon Morakot has been severely criticized. To regain the public trust, it will have to reinforce its non-warfare military operations capability -- a concept first initiated by the United States in 1993.
Since the Sept. 21, 1999 earthquake and the SARS outbreak in 2003, Taiwan has listed disaster prevention and relief as one of the military's major missions.
But despite that, the military did not follow world trends or understand the people's urgent needs, treating disaster relief as a side job, which left it unprepared for the most serious flooding in half a century.
After President Ma Ying-jeou and the Defense Ministry were harshly criticized, the president finally declared that disaster relief should be the military's "core mission." The people want action, and if the performance of the military lets the public down again, then it will not be long before another political transfer of power occurs.
UNITEd DAILY NEWS: Stay aloof, but not alone President Ma Ying-jeou has said three things that impress the public. He said that he would "retreat to the second line," drawing a clear line of distinction between himself and the Executive Yuan. He also said that he "absolutely will not assume the party chairmanship, drawing a clear line of distinction between himself and the KMT.
Then, lastly, he will not issue an emergency decree.
Ma is consistent in thought -- he wants to restrain his power and let the law and system prevail -- but Typhoon Morakot completely crushed his utopian vision.
He now goes to the frontlines of flood-affected areas every day.
He serves concurrently not only as party chairman, but also as premier, and city and even borough head.
He has not issued an emergency decree, but he is now caught in an emergency situation.
Ma's ideas might represent a lofty vision in some respects, but they do not suit today's Taiwan. By staying aloof and appointing law-abiding officials who are incapable of coping with emergencies, he has painted himself into a corner.
Although Ma stands aloof, we think his ideas, will, and sentiments must be instilled in his team so that it can operate efficiently.
LIBERTY TIMES: Ma's promise to make Taiwan the centerpiece faces test The DGBAS recently announced that the jobless rate in July has hit 6.07 percent, while average real earnings growth in the first half of the year fell 6.84 percent, returning to the 1996 level.
President Ma Ying-jeou made "6-3-3"-- an economic growth of six percent, a per capita income of US$30,000 a year and a jobless rate of under 3 percent -- his campaign promise, and he failed to deliver it in just one year.
He also advocated direct transportation and the opening of Chinese tourists, but the jobless rate rose to more than 6 percent from around 4 percent a year ago even though both goals were achieved.
But after the bounced campaign check, and the disaster of Typhoon Morakot, Ma's approval rating has plunged to lower than 20 percent.
To stem the sliding approval rating, he has resorted to sacrificing more of Taiwan's interests by pushing for the signing of an economic cooperation framework agreement with China.
The typhoon should serve as a warning, and if Ma insists on his own way and continues to tilt toward China, the outlook of Taiwan will be even more pessimistic, and his approval rating will fall to a new low.
(By Lilian Wu)




Updated : 2021-04-19 16:45 GMT+08:00