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Most schools damaged by typhoon will be ready for new school year

Most schools damaged by typhoon will be ready for new school year

Many schools in southern Taiwan were destroyed or damaged by Typhoon Morakot-triggered landslides and flooding, but most of them will be ready when the new school year begins next week, Education Minister Cheng Jei-cheng said yesterday. A total of 1,312 schools in central and southern Taiwan were affected by the storm and its aftermath, with damage to the properties and buildings estimated at NT$2.59 billion (US$78.8 million). Of these, 1,145 were junior high schools and elementary schools, 126 were high schools and 41 were universities and colleges. Cheng said he was confident that all universities and colleges would be ready for the opening of school except for Chung Hwa University of Medical Technology in Tainan, which sustained major damage during Typhoon Morakot.
Eighteen junior high schools and elementary schools in Nantou and Kaohsiung that were completely destroyed by the storm will also not be ready, forcing 1,335 students to attend classes in other areas.
In determining where the children will be resettled, Cheng said the four main criteria will be allowing students to live with their parents, arranging alternative school locations as close to home as possible, respecting the will of students and parents, and respecting aboriginal culture.
Cheng acknowledged it would be impossible to satisfy everyone, however, and he anticipated that students from several damaged schools will have to live in dorms and attend school by bus.
In the heavily battered Alishan area, students will still attend class in the area's eight schools, but if roads connecting the mountain region to the outside world remain inaccessible, the government will have the military get textbooks and teachers there, Cheng said.
The education minister was confident that the 63 junior high and elementary schools and eight universities still being cleaned would be ready for the start of the fall semester. Despite disruptions in transportation and damage to school buildings, Cheng said textbooks would arrive in students' hands by Aug. 30. The Sayling Wen Cultural & Educational Foundation has donated NT$4 million to subsidize half of the cost of reprinting the textbooks.


Updated : 2021-07-25 12:17 GMT+08:00