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Taiwan's oldest person passes away

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The identification card of a Bunan woman who was born 26 years before Taiwan was established in 1911 is shown. The woman passed away on the morning of...
Taiwan's oldest person passes away
Taiwan's oldest person passes away

116 year old woman passes away

The identification card of a Bunan woman who was born 26 years before Taiwan was established in 1911 is shown. The woman passed away on the morning of...

Taipei, Aug. 24 (CNA) Taiwan's oldest person, 125-year-old Bunun tribesman Hu Yeh-mei, passed away early Monday.
Hu's ID showed her to be born Feb. 10, 1885, making her the Taiwan's oldest person according to Ministry of the Interior records.
Hu never had a major illness during her entire life, which could be because she did physically demanding work in her youth, chopping wood and planting mullet in the mountains.
She also hiked in the mountains every day, enabling her to keep her body healthy despite her advancing years. She gained fame five years ago when she had a cameo role in a TV series.
Her nephew, Hu Wu-jen, said she had the best temperament of all her siblings. "Her moderate temper and remaining close to nature were the secrets of her longevity," he said.
She suffered broken bones to her limbs six years ago and became wheelchair bound. but she otherwise remained healthy, her nephew said. She maintained a good appetite, and would open her eyes wide whenever she heard that it was time to eat.
Last year, she was temporarily placed in a nursing home because younger relatives were busy farming.
The beginning in the end came in early Feb. when she felt sick and was sent to the hospital, where she was diagnosed with stomach cancer.
On Sunday night she suffered from multiple organ failure and was taken home to die.
Hu was never married, leaving her nephew to take care of the funeral.
He said that in observation of the traditional Bunun funeral practice, he would not publicly announce her death but rather only notify friends and relatives so that they could accompany her at a final meal Sept. 1 before her burial, and tell her that "she should come back to see relatives and friends." (By Lilian Wu)