Georgia race finally heads to voters; DC watching closely

Karen Handel, Republican candidate for Georgia's 6th congressional district greets diners during a campaign stop at Old Hickory House i

Jon Ossoff, Democratic candidate for Georgia's 6th congressional district talks to supporters during a stop at a campaign office in Cha

Pamphlets sit outside the campaign office of Jon Ossoff, Democratic candidate for Georgia's 6th congressional district in Chamblee, Ga.

Jon Ossoff, Democratic candidate for Georgia's 6th congressional district talks to supporters during a stop at a campaign office in Cha

Karen Handel, Republican candidate for Georgia's 6th congressional district talks to reporters during a campaign stop at Old Hickory Ho

A sticker decorates the shirt of Karen Handel, Republican candidate for Georgia's 6th congressional district as she talks to reporters

Jon Ossoff, Democratic candidate for Georgia's 6th congressional district, talks to reporters during a stop at a campaign office in Cha

Karen Handel, Republican candidate for Georgia's 6th congressional district, center, greets diners during a campaign stop at Old Hickor

ROSWELL, Ga. (AP) — The most expensive House race in U.S. history heads to voters Tuesday in suburban Atlanta.

Either Republican Karen Handel will claim a seat that's been in her party's hands since 1979 or Democrat Jon Ossoff will manage an upset that will rattle Washington ahead of the 2018 midterm elections.

Their matchup in Georgia's 6th Congressional District has become a proxy for the national political atmosphere and a test of GOP strength early in Donald Trump's presidency.

Ossoff led an April primary but fell just short of an outright victory, sending an already costly race into a two-month runoff campaign.

Trump barely won the district in November, giving Democrats an opening once Republican Tom Price resigned the seat to join the president's Cabinet as health secretary.